In a op-ed for The New York Times, titled “Why I Speak Up for Black Women,” Megan Thee Stallion digs into the idea that Black women, like herself, are “disrespected and degraded.”

The essay, accompanied by a video, finds the “Don’t Stop” rapper addressing the traumatic events that have occurred since July 12, when she was shot in both her feet.

“I was recently the victim of an act of violence by a man. After a party, I was shot twice as I walked away from him,” Megan wrote, referencing the incident in which Tory Lanez has been charged with shooting her as she was getting out of a vehicle.

“We were not in relationship,” Megan continued. “Truthfully, I was shocked that I ended up in that place.”

Megan mentioned the “skepticism and judgment” she faced subsequently from people who “publicly questioned” the validity of her account of what happened. She claims self-reflection helped her understand the “weight of contradictory expectations and misguided preconceptions” placed on Black women, which she addressed in her performance on Saturday Night Live October 4.

“I recently used the stage at Saturday Night Live to harshly rebuke Kentucky’s Attorney General Daniel Cameron for his appalling conduct in denying Breonna Taylor and her family justice,” Megan explained. “I anticipated some backlash.”

During Megan’s performance, the phrase “Protect Black women” was projected on a screen behind her — a phrase some find “controversial.”

“It’s ridiculous…We deserve to be protected as human beings,” Megan insisted.

Megan says “Black women are not naïve,” despite dealing with “conflicting messages” on a daily basis. But she anticipates foreseeable change after next month’s election.

“My hope is that Kamala Harris’ candidacy for vice president will usher in an era where Black women in 2020 are no longer ‘making history’ for achieving things that should have been accomplished decades ago,” declared Megan.

By Rachel George
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